Perfect Storm of Events

Grounded Sailboat    Last week’s blog touched on change and how difficult it is to enact; this week I want to build on some of what I expressed last week. When I was about 13 my father owned a small sailboat which he kept on the Florida Gulf Coast. One Saturday during late spring my father, sister and I went for a sail, and in the early afternoon we anchored in a small bay to eat lunch and to swim.
On that day the wind was out of the north and there was a full moon due to rise that evening. About 4 PM my father decided we needed to return to the marina and we made preparation to get underway when my father noticed the tide was racing out. He shouted at me to hurry, but it was too late. Before we could even fully grasp what was happening the boat was high and dry despite our best efforts to beat the falling tide. We did not have a radio and this was in the days before cell phones, and we had not told anyone where we were going, so we could not contact anyone to tell them what had happened.
We were not in any danger because the boat was completely out of the water on a sandbar, but as we learned later, my mother was frantic. My older brother spent hours contacting law enforcement to try and figure out where we were, but it was to no avail. Six hours later the tide changed and we made it back to the marina and then drove home.
Forty years later this event is nothing but a funny story, but the fear my mom felt then was real and totally avoidable. A radio would have made it possible to contact her and a trip plan would have told the marine patrol where to look for us. Our failure to plan was a plan for failure; we had created our own perfect storm of events.
When we want to change it will not just happen; we have to map a way forward or life will just happen. When life just happens we become reactionary and are blown about by the winds of fortune. There is power in planning, but too often we do not want to plan because we have to think about things we do not want to think about, like death; however, a little planning can go a long way to save ourselves and others needless grief. Each of us owe it to those we love to prepare for tomorrow; it is the adult thing to do. Let us know If we can help.

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